Iain couzin

Key researchers in computational social science and data science will present recent advances in the data-driven modeling and prediction of social systems. They will highlight future opportunities and challenges in this exciting research area at the intersection of computer, natural and social science. The symposium will be opened by Prof. The growing availability of digital behavioral data in social computing systems generates both opportunities and challenges for the data-driven study of collective behavior in social systems.

Using examples from real social systems, this opening talk will highlight some of the open challenges in data science and network science and I will present first steps of how we can address them. I will further discuss how we can apply data science and network analysis techniques to latrge corpora of found data to test theories from the social sciences. Social Cyber-security is an emerging scientific area focused on the science to characterize, understand, and forecast cyber-mediated changes in human behavior, social, cultural and political outcomes, and to build the cyber-infrastructure needed for society to persist in its essential character in a cyber-mediated information environment under changing conditions, actual or imminent social cyber-threats.

Social cyber-security is an inherently computational social science in which news methods and theories predicated on a deep understanding of social behavior and the methodology of high dimensional network analysis, simulation, and machine learning. The methods and theories being developed for social cyber-security: a take the socio-political context into account methodologically and empirically; b are predicated on issues of influence, persuasion, manipulation, and theories that link human behavior to behavior in the cyber-mediated environment; and c are focused on operational utility rather than just improving scores for machine learning algorithms or theory testing.

In this presentation the basis of social cyber-security is presented, then key developments related to information operations in social media are used to illustrate the research challenges and operational goals in this area.

Examples relate to the spread of disinformation, the use of bots in elections, and discrediting campaigns are presented. The need to move beyond detection and classification to dynamic operation is discussed, as is the limit of current classification systems in this area. Examples are presented that show how change in social and knowledge networks both capture the spread and impact of disinformation and the activities to counter it. Social organizations should be, at the same time, robust to withstand shocks and adaptive to cope with change.

To gain a fundamental understanding of these seemingly contradictory requirements, we utilize data science, network science and social science. Data driven models of network ensembles allow us to quantify potentially attainable states of social organizations, and to measure significant deviations.

Our approach leads to a dynamic reformulation of stability in contrast to established concepts of equilibria. Applying controllability theory to social networks, we model socially desirable system states by influencing nodes and their interactions.

iain couzin

Our methods of quantifying social dynamics open new perspectives for, and invite to rediscuss, computational social sciences. Additional broadcasting to lecture hall RAA-G is available.

Participation is free but seating is limited. To facilitate our planning, kindly indicate your attendance using the form below or via E-Mail to scholtes ifi. No data are submitted to the server. Speakers Key researchers in computational social science and data science will present recent advances in the data-driven modeling and prediction of social systems.

Kathleen M.

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Anti Social Dynamics in Online Communities. Modeling Minorities in Social Networks. When Friday, April 26 pm - pm.

RSVP Participation is free but seating is limited. Carley Carnegie Mellon University Social Cyber-Security Dynamics Social Cyber-security is an emerging scientific area focused on the science to characterize, understand, and forecast cyber-mediated changes in human behavior, social, cultural and political outcomes, and to build the cyber-infrastructure needed for society to persist in its essential character in a cyber-mediated information environment under changing conditions, actual or imminent social cyber-threats.

Send RSVP.Iain Couzin, a leader in the study of collective animal behaviour, is the recipient of the Lagrange — CRT Foundation Prizethe first and most important international recognition dedicated to the study of complex systems across all disciplines. The prize and medal will be awarded to Couzin at a ceremony in Turin on October 17th. Couzin is renowned for his pioneering work on collective sensing, information processing, and decision-making in animal groups.

Working on a wide range of organisms, from locust plagues to fish schools, bird flocks and human crowds, and developing and employing some of the most advanced technologies in behavioural science, he and his group have consistently provided new and deep insights that shed light on the fundamental principles that underlie collective action in nature.

This work has had, and continues to have, tremendous impact on a wide range of fields including behaviour, ecology, psychology, evolutionary biology, statistical physics, engineering, network theory, self-organisation, and complexity science. Couzin was awarded the Lagrange — CRT Foundation Prize for his outstanding and interdisciplinary contributions to the study of collective behaviour. This has been central to our approach, and the prize is a testament to the collective work of the amazing young scientists with whom I have had the enormous privilege to work with in my lab over the years, and the support of my mentors, family and colleagues around the world.

Turin, - who was regarded by many of his contemporaries as the greatest living mathematician. He made major contributions to number theory and to analytic and celestial mechanics including being one of the inventors of the calculus of variations. He also created the first partial differential equations; invented a new field of mechanics, Lagrangian mechanics; created the concept of a potential e. Lagrange was largely self-taught and did not have a university degree.

Couzin graduated from the University of St. Lagrange, however, found mathematical ways that allowed us to consider individuals as the focus of interest. Award ceremony: 17 October in Turin The prize is worth overall Back to news.Our research focuses on revealing the principles that underlie collective animal behavior.

Understanding how social influence shape biological processes is a central challenge, essential for achieving progress in a variety of fields ranging from the organization and evolution of coordinated collective action among cells, or animals, to the dynamics of information exchange in human societies.

By developing an integrated experimental and theoretical research program we aim to explore functional properties of groups in a context that can reveal how, and why, social behavior has evolved. A fundamental problem in a wide range of disciplines is understanding how functional complexity at a macroscopic scale results from the actions and interactions among the individual components.

We use a wide range of animal systems to address this fundamental question. Scientists from the Univeristy of Konstanz and the co-located Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior turn to CT scanning and 3D printing technology to engineer a precise answer to the question: what are animals choosing when they choose a home? Department of Collective Behavior.

iain couzin

Devastating swarms of locusts are devouring everything in their path from Africa to India. Scientists and citizens are waging a massive war with cutting edge technology to stop the infestation from becoming a deadly plague.

iain couzin

Film by CuriosityStream. Iain Couzin has created a playground for biologists. Cameras follow groups of fish, grasshoppers balance on a ball in a virtual reality container and birds fly around with small backpacks, with which all their conversations are overheard.

Film by tv NTR more. Scientists dissect the complex choices of animals.

Iain Couzin and the Science of Flocking

Are fish aware of themselves? The cleaner wrasse responds to a mirror reflection as self—but does this mean that fish are self-aware? Two Konstanz researchers among the most influential scientist's in the world. Open in new window. Go to Editor View.A new system called PiVR—named after the low-cost Raspberry Pi computer that runs its software—creates working artificial environments for small animals such as zebra fish larvae and fruit flies.

Iain Couzin: Lessons from a Cannibal Plague

The technology both provides the environment and tracks the animal within it using cameras and other sensors. This approach is useful in experiments aiming to learn more about how an external stimulus spurs the brain to perform an action. With PiVR, the stimulus takes the form of light, which brightens or dims depending on where the animal goes—as if it were moving toward or away from a virtual light source or in and out of virtual shadows.

Say researchers want to see how a zebra fish larva behaves in the presence of a round spotlight that is brightest at its center. As the larva reacts to these changes, the chamber tracks its every move with cameras and other sensors.

Doing so lets the researchers study how animals use visual stimuli to navigate. Light alone can only create simple environments.

But by combining PiVR with a field called optogenetics, the researchers produced a much more complex virtual world. In the example of a VR system that creates an imaginary spotlight, this technique would be like putting the animal in the presence of a smell that grows more intense as it moves toward the brightest part of the circle.

The U. Santa Barbara team is not the only group to develop virtual reality for small animals. Creating such complex virtual environments can get expensive. The low cost could make it easier for a single lab to afford building and running multiple PiVR systems.

Tadres suggests undergraduate and high school students could use it as well. Other researchers agree. Sophie Bushwick is an associate editor at Scientific Americancovering technology. You have free article s left. Already a subscriber? Sign in.At the beginning of your post, please attribute the writer and Ensia as the original source and link to the Ensia article. Stories may not be edited without permission from Ensia.

Please send an email to contact ensia. Images and other visuals are not included in this license. For specific questions related to visuals, please contact Todd Reubold. For other inquiries, email contact ensia. The post is now in your clipboard. In the case of Iain Couzin, the appropriate mental image would be something like a soaring flock of starlings so thick they look like smoke against the sky. Or a tide of flightless locust nymphs flowing across desert dunes. You might picture minnows swimming in schools.

Or even commuters flowing through a subway station—undulating ribbons of humanity. His fascination with movement in turn is moving the science of animal behavior to explore whole new realms, which include uncovering insights that might help keep people and nature compatible in an increasingly crowded world.

Ironically, it was blind ants that led Couzin into this line of research. As a biology major at the University of St. Andrews in the U. He contacted Franks and ended up pursuing a Ph. Soon, under the guidance of another graduate student, Guy Blanchard, his interests shifted from insects into collective behavior more generally. Using algorithms, computer programs, mathematical equations and more, Couzin observes, models, simulates and draws conclusions about those emergent properties from the many and varied ways living things move in unison.

Implications for the environment and sustainability are abundant. Computational models of the evolution of animal migration, for instance, have offered two profound insights into this large-scale collective behavior, which is threatened around the world by human encroachment on natural lands. First, encouragingly, migrations can be surprisingly robust. Animals may be able to maintain migration patterns even when they have to adjust to highways and other obstacles.

In the s, he notes, passenger pigeons blackened the sky by the billions.

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By they were extinct. Though he prefers studying nonhuman animals, Couzin acknowledges people are a big part of the picture as well. One project he started in looks at two linked collective-behavior systems—ocean fish and fishermen.

Instead, he seems to be taking a lesson from his study subjects and staying open to the influence of others as he sets his course. Ensia shares solutions-focused stories free of charge through our online magazine and partner media. That means audiences around the world have ready access to stories that can — and do — help them shape a better future. If you value our work, please show your support today.Grouping organisms, such as schooling fish, often have to make rapid decisions in uncertain and dangerous environments.

As each organism has relatively local sensing ability, coordinated animal groups have evolved collective strategies that allow individuals to access higher-order computational abilities at the collective level. Using a combined theoretical and experimental approach involving insect and vertebrate groups, I will address how, and why, individuals move in unison and investigate the principles of information transfer in these groups, particularly focusing on leadership, collective consensus decision-making and the evolution of collective animal behavior.

He did his Ph. D at the University of Bath, UK. His work aims to reveal the fundamental principles that underlie evolved collective behavior and consequently his research includes the study of a wide range of systems from cellular aggregates to insect swarms, fish schools and human crowds.

He is a member of the Faculty of Biology and in recognition of his research he was a recipient of a Searle Scholar Award in and the Mohammed Dahleh Award in Tags: seminarspring Liza Moscovice Diane M. Steven C. David Sloan Wilson David C. Lahti Richard R. Aiello Mark E. Garruto Adam Siepel.

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Iain Couzin: The Principles of Collective Behaviour

Rayor Dan Eisenberg Kevin L. Polk Andrew C. Gallup Kevin M. Joseph L.

Prof. Dr. Iain D. Couzin

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Gad Saad T. Joel Wade Nelson G. Hairston, Jr. Francis J. Yammarino Derek Turner Matthew M. Aaron J. Andrew C. Gallup Liza R. Moscovice Justin R.Couzin is renowned for his pioneering work on collective sensing, information processing, and decision-making in animal groups. Working on a wide range of organisms, from locust plagues to fish schools, bird flocks and human crowds, and developing and employing some of the most advanced technologies in behavioural science, he and his group have consistently provided new and deep insights that shed light on the fundamental principles that underlie collective action in nature.

This work has had, and continues to have, tremendous impact on a wide range of fields including behaviour, ecology, psychology, evolutionary biology, statistical physics, engineering, network theory, self-organisation, and complexity science.

Couzin was awarded the Lagrange—CRT Foundation Prize for his outstanding and interdisciplinary contributions to the study of collective behaviour.

This has been central to our approach, and the prize is a testament to the collective work of the amazing young scientists with whom I have had the enormous privilege to work with in my lab over the years, and the support of my mentors, family and colleagues around the world. Turin, — who was regarded by many of his contemporaries as the greatest living mathematician. He made major contributions to number theory and to analytic and celestial mechanics including being one of the inventors of the calculus of variations.

He also created the first partial differential equations; invented a new field of mechanics, Lagrangian mechanics; created the concept of a potential e. Lagrange was largely self-taught and did not have a university degree.

Couzin graduated from the University of St. Andrews, UK, before beginning his studies of collective behaviour during his Ph. Lagrange, however, found mathematical ways that allowed us to consider individuals as the focus of interest.

This approach, termed 'Lagrangian' or 'individual-based' became the focus of my thesis work and remains absolutely central to how we study collective behaviour today". All News Phys. This Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization and is provided to you "as is" with little or no review from Science X staff. Credit: University of Konstanz.

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iain couzin

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